Eglė Pilkauskaitė

egle@pilkauskaite.com

+370 611 66 488

 
Egle Pilkauskaite

Egle Pilkauskaite is a mixed media artist based in Vilnius. Her practice is rooted in conceptual investigations of themes such as: ruins, displacement, the anthropocene, or new materialism, and driven by exploration of various industrial, as well as craft-oriented, techniques and materials. She holds a BA from Camberwell College of Art.


 
Repetitive Labour Routine
steel, tar, wax, artificial velvet, oak
113 x 116 cm
2017
The piece interrogates the themes of identity of objects and the multifaceted nature of processual creative practice. It functions affectively on a spectrum of volume - at first it astounds with its scale, yet the more it draws in attention, the more distinct minute detail gets revealed. The main driving force behind the piece is the blending of boundaries between the initial found object and the handcrafted wax layer.

The technique used requires a continuous, uniquely detail-oriented and repetitive process, which becomes a constant meditative negotiation between following the spontaneous structure of the found object and imposing a new, carefully crafted layer upon it. As a result, we witness an encounter between the natural force of fire and the Promethean drive to remaking the given. In this case, the particular process of making becomes meticulous needlework, positing typically feminized labour as a new site for Promethean ambitions.

 
Fire
burned glass, framed
70,5 x 70,5 cm
2017

 
Aesthetics of destruction
giclée print on Fine Art Photo Rag 308g paper, X-Ray, framed
2017

62.7 x 72.2 cm, edition 4 of 4
72.7 x 62.8 cm, edition 2 of 2

 
Object in Black
The piece interrogates the questions of perception, specifically the relation it creates between the viewer and the object.Intense black colour invites audience into an ambiguous poetic darkness. The physical form of the unknown object resembles mysterious jewel or artefact.
giclée print on Fine Art Photo Rag 308 g paper framed (3-004; 10101050)
2016

100 cm x 100 cm
edition 3 of 3

60 x 60 cm
edition 5 of 5

 
Presence of an image
plaster, steel, graphite
60 x 220 x 30cm
2014
What do you do if the perfect white wall gets dirty? What do you do if you make the perfect white wall dirty? Try to embrace the dirt and explore the surface. The wall is just a metaphor; the most important is the presence of the dirt and where it takes you. The element of risk and not knowing the outcome is the trigger for creative process. What intrigues me is how things take on certain shapes and acquire specific textures. Accidental marks, made by human or nature, could be interpreted as archives. Nature's adaptation to the man-made constructions is one of my main inspirations. By mimicking the marks that I find in different urban spaces I recount stories of the city.

 
Burned Car










 
Dialectical Landscape
wood, glass, led light, dirt
40 x 40 x 16 cm
The key concept behind this work was the interrogation of our modes of perception and cognition. At the first contact with the piece it is almost impossible to determine the origin of the exposed object. From the outset the lightbox resembles a museum exhibit, with an intrinsic archeological value, yet the perception of it changes once the source of the piece is revealed. The process of appreciation of the beauty of an artefact turns into one of admiration of a formation of dirt - a product of pollution. Challenging the pre-established concepts of beauty is a recurrent interest I cultivate in my work.




The dirt used in this piece was originally found on a street in London. It is an incredibly fragile material, comparable to a peeled skin tissue or a wing of a butterfly. It comes from a specific place, yet it does not bear any recognizable signs of its primary location. Its distinctive shape resembles a map, or an outline of a continent, however it does not serve as cartography of a particular space. Instead, it simply creates an allusion to a location and can be treated as a dialectical landscape; the surface of the streets marked by dirt becomes an unconventional archive of the city.




The work also presents a personal dimension. The dirt forming this piece accompanied me on my travels around Europe. Now, that it is preserved, it relates to all those places at once and no one place in particular. It becomes an interesting, more personal and singular variation of a non-place. The space it represents, and at the same time creates, is deterritorialized. It becomes immobilized, and its original pluralistic distance becomes immeasurable.




 
Muffler Drawings
exhaust mixed with water, graphite pencil
49 x 37 cm
2017

 
Paper Surface - Any Surface
pencil, paper, framed
(3-004; 10101050)
85 x 55 cm
2016

 
Symbiosis





































































































































































































































































































Bronze I
edition 1 of 1
14 x 16,5 x 13,5 cm
2016

Bronze II
edition 1 of 1
23 x 23 x 18 cm
2016

Dark Red Touch
plaster, flock fibre
edition 1 of 1
23 x 23 x 18 cm
2016

Grey Touch
plaster, flock fibre
edition 2 of 2
23 x 23 x 18 cm
2016

Green Touch
plaster, flock fibre
edition 2 of 2
23 x 23 x 18 cm
2016

Red Touch
plaster, flock fibre
edition 2 of 2
23 x 23 x 18 cm
2016

Symbiosis is a series of artwork oscillating between the themes of the organic - the analogue - the digital, as well as the relationship between authenticity and reproduction. The essence of the work is carried out in both spatial and temporal dimensions, encompassing a vast array of techniques and craftsmanship. The series originates from a natural phenomenon and concludes in a series of highly technical prints, contributing to the discussion of art and authenticity in relation to copy and reproduction - the omnipresent discourse ever since Walter Benjamin’s 1935 famous essay ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’. While Benjamin is highly suspicious of the effect technical practices such as photography might have on the ‘aura’, the authenticity of the work of art, Pilkauskaite shifts the main focus to the question of identity.


The series follows the tropes recurrent in the oeuvre of Pilkauskaite, with the crucial emphasis on the creative process itself. Here, the process examines the relationship between the technological, the technical, and the techne. The initial sculptural objects take their shape directly from a cast of a tree burl, therefore on one hand they constitute a copy, yet on the other, they become artefacts preserving the DNA of an organic phenomenon, and represent a uniquely precious, indexical relationship with nature. This relationship is maintained throughout the whole series, even while the subsequent techniques (3d scanning, rendering and contact printing) become more mechanical and technologically intricate. The artist's main stake in this indexicality is contact. 


The contact carrying the work's identity is both analogue (the two collapsing into one - the tactile sculpting process) and digital (the singular one splitting into two - the laser touching the sculpture and translating its surface into a full binary map). The initial object undergoes a process of transformation, fragmenting, and detachment, yet its identity gets preserved as an eternal spectre in its every subsequent iteration. The initial function and purpose of the tree burl is lost, however, fragments of its identity are still haunting the derived artefacts. In the final pieces crowning the series - the large-scale prints- the agent of creation is the light, not the binary code. While the digital mesh can be conceptualised as a shadow of the original pieces, here, the contact transforms the tactile into the luminous. The digitally constructed shadow translates into analogue light and concludes the series.


Pilkauskaite finds the delicate balance between respecting the found object she works with, and channeling her own creative input and artistic direction. The work in its various stages and mutations always preserves the quality of the direct touch and contact with the source material, yet simultaneously transgresses the constraints of mere mechanical reproduction, creating elaborate works of art which preserve the close relationship with their organic origins.

Magdalena Krysztoforska







 
Symbiosis Contact Prints
contact print, photographic paper, framed
edition 1 of 1
50 x 50 cm
2016
Giclée print on Fine Art Photo Rag 308 g paper, framed
edition 1 of 1
80 x 80 cm
2016
© 2017 Egle Pilkauskaite. All rights reserved.
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